Overcoming Chronic Constipation


Bristol Stool Chart

As I child, I remember being in awe of my sister’s ability to have a bowel movement several times a day. I was doing good to have a bowel movement two – three times per week and she could do that with ease in one day. Over the years, I experienced a variety of degenerative diseases and issues not understanding that my inability to have proper bowel movement was the cause. Once I received the knowledge, I was able to heal myself. My goal with this blog post is to pass some valuable information along that helped me through the process.

So what causes constipation? Here’s a list of possibilities.

  • Not eating enough for each meal or often enough throughout the day
  • Not going to the bathroom when you feel the urge
  • Intestinal lining is unhealthy and doesn’t produce enough mucous to properly lubricate your stools
  • Insufficient intake of foods with vitamin A (e.g. dark leafy greens, sweet potatoes, squash, marjoram, dill, oregano, dried apricots, cantaloupe, any lettuce except for iceberg, carrots, cod liver oil, or organic grass-fed organ meat)
  • Insufficient intake of spring water
  • Insufficient intake of water-rich foods (e.g. apples, cucumbers, tomatoes, grapefruit, any lettuce except iceberg, watermelon, broccoli, grapes, melons, berries, pears, celery, and papaya)
  • Insufficient intake of fiber-rich foods (e.g. avocados, pears, oranges, bananas, mangos, papayas, artichoke, squash, sweet potatoes, cabbage, dark leafy greens, and non-glutenous grains)
  • Stress and holding in negative emotions
  • Not consuming healthy fats (e.g. extra virgin coconut oil, red palm oil, organic butter from grass-fed cows)
  • Lack of friendly bacteria in digestive tract
  • Intake of prescription or street drugs leaving heavy metals and toxins in the body
  • Excessive consumption of refined and natural sugars (including turbinado, evaporated cane juice, raw honey, sucanut, and raw agave)
  • Excessive intake of dairy (e.g. cheese, cow’s milk, sour cream, cream cheese, etc.)

Your goal is to have two-three bowel movements a day with frequent urination. It’s also key to drink at least half of your body weight in ounces of spring water each day.  So, if you weigh 150 lbs, you should be drinking 75 ounces or more of spring water each day. If half your weight in ounces is more than a gallon of spring water, just drink the gallon. For an extra boost of vitamin C and constipation relief, add fresh lemon juice to that water (not the bottled kind, it contains preservatives that aren’t good for you, plus it’s in a plastic bottle from which the liquid leaches toxins). Herbal infusions with bitter herbs can help, too.

Stress has a negative impact on your nervous system which can impact your colon’s ability to release properly. For some, it manifests as excessive release like irritable bowel syndrome or chronic diarrhea. For others, constipation is the way the emotional distress shows up. For this reason, it’s important to practice having conversations about the issues that bother you. If you’re not ready to have those conversations or feel as if they would be a waste of time, journal. Journaling is a powerful exercise as it helps you release emotions in both the natural and spiritual realm. Prayer, deep breathing, and meditation are also powerful ways to release emotions, connect in the spirit realm, and hear from God. Crystals to use during meditation for good digestion and overcoming constipation are citrine, obsidian, or jasper. For finding your voice, lapis lazuli is and excellent choice. Yoga is another stress reliever that has a powerful impact on bowel related issues.

The Bristol Stool Chart pictured above helps us understand what healthy bowel movements should look like so pay close attention to it, as well.

Love and light.

Author: Sherrice Sledge-Thomas

Sherrice Sledge-Thomas is the founder and Chief Visionary Officer at Herb Culture University. She's known as the Suburban Herbalista because her place of residence along with her life experiences have shaped her unique brand of herbalism. Sherrice's herbal studies are rooted in experiences with her "rootworking" grandmother and a host of wise women in her community. To compliment her grassroots herbalist education, she earned a Health Coaching certification from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition. She also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Liberal Arts with a focus on Women's Studies from The Ohio State University and a Master of Business Administration from Franklin University with a focus on Organizational Leadership and Management. Over the years, she's obtained a variety of certifications in the learning, leadership development, and change management space to compliment her holistic health work. This is the reason many of her certification programs and workshops incorporate elements of strategic planning and execution. Sherrice is the mother of three handsome young men. She enjoys meditation, yoga, and free-spirited dancing.

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